Surgical clipping may lead to better results than coil embolization

Results from a series of 101 consecutive unruptured intracranial aneurysms

Christian Raftopoulos, Pierre Goffette, Geraldo Vaz, Najib Ramzi, Jean Louis Scholtes, Xavier Wittebole, Pierre Mathurin, Perry Ng, Randall T. Higashida, Robert H. Rosenwasser, Bernard R. Bendok, L. Nelson Hopkins, H. Hunt Batjer, Robert A. Solomon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Recent reports in the literature have described a significant discrepancy in adverse outcomes between coil embolization (CE; 10%) and surgical clipping (SC; 25%) for the management of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA). This discrepancy led us to analyze our experience. METHODS: In 1996, we designed a prospective study of patients with UIA in which CE was considered the treatment of choice and was performed if the interventional neuroradiologists deemed the aneurysm's fundus-to-neck ratio accessible for CE. SC was performed only if complete CE was unlikely to be achieved or in patients in whom CE already had failed. RESULTS: CE was performed in 38 patients with at least one UIA (41 UIAs, 83% in the anterior circulation). SC was performed in 39 patients with at least one UIA unsuitable for CE (59 UIAs, including 6 after failed CE, 96.5% in the anterior circulation). For CE, the total obliteration rate was 56.1%, the subtotal was 14.6%, and CE failed in 29.3%. There were transient complications in 10% of the cases and permanent complications in 7.5%. Of the 12 failed CE procedures, 7 (58%) were performed for middle cerebral artery aneurysms. For SC, the total obliteration rate was 93.2%, the subtotal was 1.7%, and SC failed (wrapping) in 5.1%. There were transient complications in 16.3% of the patients and permanent complications in 1.7%. The success rate for CE was similar to that for SC only when CE was used for aneurysms with a fundus-to-neck ratio of at least 2.5. CONCLUSION: SC can produce better results than CE in patients with UIA of the anterior circulation. CE as a first-line treatment should be reserved for patients with UIAs with a fundus-to-neck ratio of 2.5 or greater.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1280-1290
Number of pages11
JournalNeurosurgery
Volume52
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 1 2003

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Intracranial Aneurysm
Neck
Aneurysm
Prospective Studies
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Coil embolization
  • Endovascular occlusion
  • Guglielmi detachable coil
  • Surgical clipping
  • Temporary arterial clipping
  • Unruptured intracranial aneurysm

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery

Cite this

Raftopoulos, C., Goffette, P., Vaz, G., Ramzi, N., Scholtes, J. L., Wittebole, X., ... Solomon, R. A. (2003). Surgical clipping may lead to better results than coil embolization: Results from a series of 101 consecutive unruptured intracranial aneurysms. Neurosurgery, 52(6), 1280-1290.

Surgical clipping may lead to better results than coil embolization : Results from a series of 101 consecutive unruptured intracranial aneurysms. / Raftopoulos, Christian; Goffette, Pierre; Vaz, Geraldo; Ramzi, Najib; Scholtes, Jean Louis; Wittebole, Xavier; Mathurin, Pierre; Ng, Perry; Higashida, Randall T.; Rosenwasser, Robert H.; Bendok, Bernard R.; Hopkins, L. Nelson; Batjer, H. Hunt; Solomon, Robert A.

In: Neurosurgery, Vol. 52, No. 6, 01.06.2003, p. 1280-1290.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Raftopoulos, C, Goffette, P, Vaz, G, Ramzi, N, Scholtes, JL, Wittebole, X, Mathurin, P, Ng, P, Higashida, RT, Rosenwasser, RH, Bendok, BR, Hopkins, LN, Batjer, HH & Solomon, RA 2003, 'Surgical clipping may lead to better results than coil embolization: Results from a series of 101 consecutive unruptured intracranial aneurysms', Neurosurgery, vol. 52, no. 6, pp. 1280-1290.
Raftopoulos C, Goffette P, Vaz G, Ramzi N, Scholtes JL, Wittebole X et al. Surgical clipping may lead to better results than coil embolization: Results from a series of 101 consecutive unruptured intracranial aneurysms. Neurosurgery. 2003 Jun 1;52(6):1280-1290.
Raftopoulos, Christian ; Goffette, Pierre ; Vaz, Geraldo ; Ramzi, Najib ; Scholtes, Jean Louis ; Wittebole, Xavier ; Mathurin, Pierre ; Ng, Perry ; Higashida, Randall T. ; Rosenwasser, Robert H. ; Bendok, Bernard R. ; Hopkins, L. Nelson ; Batjer, H. Hunt ; Solomon, Robert A. / Surgical clipping may lead to better results than coil embolization : Results from a series of 101 consecutive unruptured intracranial aneurysms. In: Neurosurgery. 2003 ; Vol. 52, No. 6. pp. 1280-1290.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: Recent reports in the literature have described a significant discrepancy in adverse outcomes between coil embolization (CE; 10{\%}) and surgical clipping (SC; 25{\%}) for the management of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA). This discrepancy led us to analyze our experience. METHODS: In 1996, we designed a prospective study of patients with UIA in which CE was considered the treatment of choice and was performed if the interventional neuroradiologists deemed the aneurysm's fundus-to-neck ratio accessible for CE. SC was performed only if complete CE was unlikely to be achieved or in patients in whom CE already had failed. RESULTS: CE was performed in 38 patients with at least one UIA (41 UIAs, 83{\%} in the anterior circulation). SC was performed in 39 patients with at least one UIA unsuitable for CE (59 UIAs, including 6 after failed CE, 96.5{\%} in the anterior circulation). For CE, the total obliteration rate was 56.1{\%}, the subtotal was 14.6{\%}, and CE failed in 29.3{\%}. There were transient complications in 10{\%} of the cases and permanent complications in 7.5{\%}. Of the 12 failed CE procedures, 7 (58{\%}) were performed for middle cerebral artery aneurysms. For SC, the total obliteration rate was 93.2{\%}, the subtotal was 1.7{\%}, and SC failed (wrapping) in 5.1{\%}. There were transient complications in 16.3{\%} of the patients and permanent complications in 1.7{\%}. The success rate for CE was similar to that for SC only when CE was used for aneurysms with a fundus-to-neck ratio of at least 2.5. CONCLUSION: SC can produce better results than CE in patients with UIA of the anterior circulation. CE as a first-line treatment should be reserved for patients with UIAs with a fundus-to-neck ratio of 2.5 or greater.",
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AU - Goffette, Pierre

AU - Vaz, Geraldo

AU - Ramzi, Najib

AU - Scholtes, Jean Louis

AU - Wittebole, Xavier

AU - Mathurin, Pierre

AU - Ng, Perry

AU - Higashida, Randall T.

AU - Rosenwasser, Robert H.

AU - Bendok, Bernard R.

AU - Hopkins, L. Nelson

AU - Batjer, H. Hunt

AU - Solomon, Robert A.

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N2 - OBJECTIVE: Recent reports in the literature have described a significant discrepancy in adverse outcomes between coil embolization (CE; 10%) and surgical clipping (SC; 25%) for the management of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA). This discrepancy led us to analyze our experience. METHODS: In 1996, we designed a prospective study of patients with UIA in which CE was considered the treatment of choice and was performed if the interventional neuroradiologists deemed the aneurysm's fundus-to-neck ratio accessible for CE. SC was performed only if complete CE was unlikely to be achieved or in patients in whom CE already had failed. RESULTS: CE was performed in 38 patients with at least one UIA (41 UIAs, 83% in the anterior circulation). SC was performed in 39 patients with at least one UIA unsuitable for CE (59 UIAs, including 6 after failed CE, 96.5% in the anterior circulation). For CE, the total obliteration rate was 56.1%, the subtotal was 14.6%, and CE failed in 29.3%. There were transient complications in 10% of the cases and permanent complications in 7.5%. Of the 12 failed CE procedures, 7 (58%) were performed for middle cerebral artery aneurysms. For SC, the total obliteration rate was 93.2%, the subtotal was 1.7%, and SC failed (wrapping) in 5.1%. There were transient complications in 16.3% of the patients and permanent complications in 1.7%. The success rate for CE was similar to that for SC only when CE was used for aneurysms with a fundus-to-neck ratio of at least 2.5. CONCLUSION: SC can produce better results than CE in patients with UIA of the anterior circulation. CE as a first-line treatment should be reserved for patients with UIAs with a fundus-to-neck ratio of 2.5 or greater.

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KW - Endovascular occlusion

KW - Guglielmi detachable coil

KW - Surgical clipping

KW - Temporary arterial clipping

KW - Unruptured intracranial aneurysm

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