Teaching Motivational Interviewing Skills to Psychiatry Trainees: Findings of a National Survey

Misoo Abele, Julie Brown, Hicham Ibrahim, Manish K. Jha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The authors report on the current status of motivational interviewing education and training director attitudes about providing it to psychiatry residents. Methods: Training directors of general, child/adolescent and addiction psychiatry training programs were invited to participate in an anonymous online survey. Results: Of the 333 training directors who were invited to participate, 66 of 168 (39.3 %) general, 41 of 121 (33.9 %) child/adolescent, and 19 of 44 (43.2 %) addiction psychiatry training directors completed the survey. The authors found that 90.9 % of general, 80.5 % of child/adolescent, and 100 % of addiction psychiatry training programs provided motivational interviewing education. Most programs used multiple educational opportunities; the three most common opportunities were didactics, clinical practice with formal supervision, and self-directed reading. Most training directors believed that motivational interviewing was an important skill for general psychiatrists. The authors also found that 83.3 % of general, 87.8 % of child/adolescent, and 94.7 % of addiction psychiatry training directors reported that motivational interviewing should be taught during general psychiatry residency. Conclusions: Motivational interviewing skills are considered important for general psychiatrists and widely offered by training programs. Competency in motivational interviewing skills should be considered as a graduation requirement in general psychiatry training programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)149-152
Number of pages4
JournalAcademic Psychiatry
Volume40
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

Fingerprint

Motivational Interviewing
psychiatry
trainee
Psychiatry
Teaching
director
addiction
training program
Education
adolescent
psychiatrist
training method
Adolescent Psychiatry
educational opportunity
Surveys and Questionnaires
online survey
didactics
Internship and Residency
supervision
education

Keywords

  • Residents: psychotherapy
  • Residents: substance abuse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Education

Cite this

Teaching Motivational Interviewing Skills to Psychiatry Trainees : Findings of a National Survey. / Abele, Misoo; Brown, Julie; Ibrahim, Hicham; Jha, Manish K.

In: Academic Psychiatry, Vol. 40, No. 1, 01.02.2016, p. 149-152.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abele, Misoo ; Brown, Julie ; Ibrahim, Hicham ; Jha, Manish K. / Teaching Motivational Interviewing Skills to Psychiatry Trainees : Findings of a National Survey. In: Academic Psychiatry. 2016 ; Vol. 40, No. 1. pp. 149-152.
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