The art of sharing the diagnosis and management of Alzheimer's disease with patients and caregivers

Recommendations of an expert consensus panel

George T. Grossberg, Daniel D. Christensen, Patrick A. Griffith, Diana R. Kerwin, Gail Hunt, Eric J. Hall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To develop a set of recommendations for primary care physicians (PCPs) suggesting how best to communicate with patients, caregivers, and other family members regarding the diagnosis and management of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Participants: A national roundtable of 6 leading professionals involved in treating or advocating for patients with AD was convened on March 14, 2008. This roundtable included 4 leading academic physicians with diverse backgrounds (a geriatric psychiatrist, a neuropsychiatrist, a neurologist, and a geriatrician) from geographically diverse regions of the United States, who were invited on the basis of their national reputation in the field and experience working with minority populations with dementia; the executive director of a national AD advocacy organization; the executive director of a national advocacy organization for caregivers; and a medical correspondent with expertise in interviewing and small group leadership. Evidence: Expert opinion supported by academic literature (search limited to PubMed, English language, 1996-2008, search terms: Alzheimer's disease,primary care, diagnosis, management, caregiver, family, patient-physician relationship). Consensus Process: Moderated dialogue aimed at generating consensus opinion; only statements endorsed by all authors were included in the final article. Conclusions: Diagnosis and management of AD by PCPs, utilizing specialist consultation as needed, may contribute to earlier diagnosis and treatment, improved doctor-patient and doctor-caregiver communication, increased attention to caregiver needs, and better clinical and quality-of-life outcomes for patients and caregivers. A set of expert panel recommendations describing practical strategies for achieving these goals was successfully developed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPrimary Care Companion to the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 29 2010

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Art
Caregivers
Consensus
Alzheimer Disease
Primary Care Physicians
Organizations
Family Physicians
Expert Testimony
PubMed
Geriatrics
Psychiatry
Dementia
Early Diagnosis
Primary Health Care
Language
Referral and Consultation
Communication
Quality of Life
Physicians
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

The art of sharing the diagnosis and management of Alzheimer's disease with patients and caregivers : Recommendations of an expert consensus panel. / Grossberg, George T.; Christensen, Daniel D.; Griffith, Patrick A.; Kerwin, Diana R.; Hunt, Gail; Hall, Eric J.

In: Primary Care Companion to the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, Vol. 12, No. 1, 29.12.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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