The composition of gas given by mouth-to-mouth ventilation during CPR

V. Wenzel, A. H. Idris, M. J. Banner, R. S. Fuerst, K. J. Tucker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

74 Scopus citations

Abstract

Study objective: To compare the concentration of a rescuer's exhaled O2 and CO2 during mouth-to-mouth ventilation with or without chest compression. Design: Prospective repeated measures study. Simulated one- and two-rescuer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was performed as recommended by the American Heart Association. Setting: University laboratory. Participants: Fifty-five healthcare professionals certified in basic and advanced cardiac life support volunteered as rescuers in this study. Measurements and results: Thirty-three volunteers performed one-rescuer CPR, and 22 volunteers performed two-rescuer CPR. Minute ventilation for both groups increased 50% to 130% during CPR (p<0.05). During the performance of CPR, the concentration of exhaled O2 increased from 16.4 ± 0.7% to 16.9 ± 0.5% in the one- rescuer CPR group and from 16.5 ± 0.9% to 17.8 ± 0.6% in the two-rescuer CPR group (p<0.05). The concentration of exhaled CO2 in the one-rescuer CPR group did not change significantly throughout the entire experiment, but decreased in the two-rescuer CPR group from a baseline measurement of 4.0 ± 0.6% to 3.5 ± 0.4% (p<0.05). During CPR, the concentration of exhaled CO2 was 4.0 ± 0.4% in the one-rescuer CPR group compared with 3.5 ± 0.4% in the two-rescuer CPR group (p<0.05). Conclusions: The gas given by mouth-to-mouth ventilation is a hypercarbic and hypoxic mixture compared with room air. Mouth-to-mouth ventilation is the only circumstance in which a hypercarbic and hypoxic gas is given as therapy. Further laboratory and clinical studies are necessary to determine the effect of mouth-to-mouth ventilation during CPR.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1806-1810
Number of pages5
JournalCHEST
Volume106
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

Keywords

  • CO
  • cardiac arrest
  • heart-arrest-therapy
  • respiration- artificial
  • resuscitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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    Wenzel, V., Idris, A. H., Banner, M. J., Fuerst, R. S., & Tucker, K. J. (1994). The composition of gas given by mouth-to-mouth ventilation during CPR. CHEST, 106(6), 1806-1810. https://doi.org/10.1378/chest.106.6.1806