The effect of Eleutheroside E on behavioral alterations in murine sleep deprivation stress model

Lin Zhang Huang, Lei Wei, Hong Fang Zhao, Bao Kang Huang, Khalid Rahman, Lu Ping Qin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Eleutheroside E (EE), a principal component of Eleutherococcus senticosus, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and protective effects in ischemia heart etc. However, whether it can mitigate behavioral alterations induced by sleep deprivation, has not yet been elucidated. Numerous studies have demonstrated that memory deficits induced by sleep deprivation in experimental animals can be used as a model of behavioral alterations. The present study investigated the effect of EE, on cognitive performances and biochemical parameters of sleep-deprived mice. Animals were repeatedly treated with saline, 10 or 50 mg/kg EE and sleep-deprived for 72 h by the multiple platform method. Briefly, groups of 5-6 mice were placed in water tanks (45 x 34 x 17 cm), containing 12 platforms (3 cm in diameter) each, surrounded by water up to 1 cm beneath the surface or kept in their home cage. After sleep deprivation, mice showed significant behavioral impairment as evident by reduced latency entering into a dark chamber, locomotion and correctly rate in Y maze, and increased monoamines in hippocampus. However, repeated treatment with EE restored these behavioral and biochemical alterations in mice. In conclusion, the beneficial effect of EE may provide an effective and powerful strategy to alleviate behavioral alterations induced by sleep deprivation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)150-155
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Journal of Pharmacology
Volume658
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 11 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Behavioral alteration
  • Eleutheroside E
  • Locomotor
  • Passive avoidance
  • Y maze

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

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