The Effect of Underlying Liver Disease on Perioperative Outcomes Following Craniotomy for Tumor: An American College of Surgeons National Quality Improvement Program Analysis

Nicholas J. Goel, Kalil G. Abdullah, Omar A. Choudhri, David K. Kung, Timothy H. Lucas, H. Isaac Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The association between underlying liver disease and poor surgical outcomes has been well documented across a wide variety of surgical disciplines. However, little is known about the importance of liver disease in neurosurgery. In this report, we assess the independent effect of liver disease on perioperative outcomes in patients undergoing craniotomy for tumor. Methods: The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database was queried for patients undergoing craniotomy for tumor from 2006 to 2015. Presence and severity of underlying liver disease was assessed with the aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index and the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease-Sodium scores, computed from preoperative laboratory values. Results: Among 11,897 patients, mild and advanced disease was identified in 2.4% and 1.9% of patients, respectively. Rates of 30-day mortality were 4.5% and 15.8% in these patients, compared with 3.1% in patients with healthy livers. The 30-day complication rate was 40.3%, 28.0%, and 19.8% in patients with advanced, mild, and no liver disease, respectively. In multivariate analysis, the presence of any liver disease (mild or advanced) was independently associated with mortality (OR = 2.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.68–3.59; P < 0.001), morbidity (OR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.18–1.87; P = 0.001), and length of hospital stay over 10 days (OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.07–1.70; P = 0.012), when compared with 13 covariates. Liver disease showed the strongest independent association with mortality of all risk factors analyzed. Conclusions: Liver disease is an independent predictor of poor 30-day outcomes following craniotomy for tumor. Consideration of underlying liver function can have a role in surgical decision making and postoperative care for these patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e85-e96
JournalWorld Neurosurgery
Volume115
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Craniotomy
Quality Improvement
Liver Diseases
Neoplasms
Confidence Intervals
Mortality
Length of Stay
End Stage Liver Disease
Postoperative Care
Liver
Neurosurgery
Aspartate Aminotransferases
Decision Making
Blood Platelets
Multivariate Analysis
Sodium
Databases
Morbidity

Keywords

  • Craniotomy
  • Liver disease
  • NSQIP
  • Outcomes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

The Effect of Underlying Liver Disease on Perioperative Outcomes Following Craniotomy for Tumor : An American College of Surgeons National Quality Improvement Program Analysis. / Goel, Nicholas J.; Abdullah, Kalil G.; Choudhri, Omar A.; Kung, David K.; Lucas, Timothy H.; Chen, H. Isaac.

In: World Neurosurgery, Vol. 115, 07.2018, p. e85-e96.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: The association between underlying liver disease and poor surgical outcomes has been well documented across a wide variety of surgical disciplines. However, little is known about the importance of liver disease in neurosurgery. In this report, we assess the independent effect of liver disease on perioperative outcomes in patients undergoing craniotomy for tumor. Methods: The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database was queried for patients undergoing craniotomy for tumor from 2006 to 2015. Presence and severity of underlying liver disease was assessed with the aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index and the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease-Sodium scores, computed from preoperative laboratory values. Results: Among 11,897 patients, mild and advanced disease was identified in 2.4{\%} and 1.9{\%} of patients, respectively. Rates of 30-day mortality were 4.5{\%} and 15.8{\%} in these patients, compared with 3.1{\%} in patients with healthy livers. The 30-day complication rate was 40.3{\%}, 28.0{\%}, and 19.8{\%} in patients with advanced, mild, and no liver disease, respectively. In multivariate analysis, the presence of any liver disease (mild or advanced) was independently associated with mortality (OR = 2.46; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 1.68–3.59; P < 0.001), morbidity (OR, 1.49; 95{\%} CI, 1.18–1.87; P = 0.001), and length of hospital stay over 10 days (OR, 1.35; 95{\%} CI, 1.07–1.70; P = 0.012), when compared with 13 covariates. Liver disease showed the strongest independent association with mortality of all risk factors analyzed. Conclusions: Liver disease is an independent predictor of poor 30-day outcomes following craniotomy for tumor. Consideration of underlying liver function can have a role in surgical decision making and postoperative care for these patients.",
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T2 - An American College of Surgeons National Quality Improvement Program Analysis

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AU - Abdullah, Kalil G.

AU - Choudhri, Omar A.

AU - Kung, David K.

AU - Lucas, Timothy H.

AU - Chen, H. Isaac

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N2 - Background: The association between underlying liver disease and poor surgical outcomes has been well documented across a wide variety of surgical disciplines. However, little is known about the importance of liver disease in neurosurgery. In this report, we assess the independent effect of liver disease on perioperative outcomes in patients undergoing craniotomy for tumor. Methods: The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database was queried for patients undergoing craniotomy for tumor from 2006 to 2015. Presence and severity of underlying liver disease was assessed with the aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index and the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease-Sodium scores, computed from preoperative laboratory values. Results: Among 11,897 patients, mild and advanced disease was identified in 2.4% and 1.9% of patients, respectively. Rates of 30-day mortality were 4.5% and 15.8% in these patients, compared with 3.1% in patients with healthy livers. The 30-day complication rate was 40.3%, 28.0%, and 19.8% in patients with advanced, mild, and no liver disease, respectively. In multivariate analysis, the presence of any liver disease (mild or advanced) was independently associated with mortality (OR = 2.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.68–3.59; P < 0.001), morbidity (OR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.18–1.87; P = 0.001), and length of hospital stay over 10 days (OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.07–1.70; P = 0.012), when compared with 13 covariates. Liver disease showed the strongest independent association with mortality of all risk factors analyzed. Conclusions: Liver disease is an independent predictor of poor 30-day outcomes following craniotomy for tumor. Consideration of underlying liver function can have a role in surgical decision making and postoperative care for these patients.

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KW - NSQIP

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