The emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in United States hospitals. Possible role of the house staff-patient transfer circuit

R. W. Haley, A. W. Hightower, R. F. Khabbaz, C. Thornsberry, W. J. Martone, J. R. Allen, J. M. Hughes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

298 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Infections with methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus appear to be occurring with increasing frequency in some U.S. hospitals about a decade after a similar increase in Britain and other countries. In the United States, clustered methicillin-resistant S. aureus infections reported in scientific journals and in three hospital surveys have been almost entirely in large, tertiary referral hospitals affiliated with medical schools. Among 63 hospitals regularly reporting infections from 1974 to 1981 in the National Nosocomial Infections Study, the increase in methicillin-resistant S. aureus infections was entirely due to substantial increases in only four hospitals, all of which were large, tertiary referral centers affiliated with medical schools. The predominance of methicillin-resistant S. aureus infections in these large hospitals may be due to the large numbers of patients at high risk of infection and to the interhospital spread of the organism by the transfer of infected patients and house staff from similar hospitals or from nursing homes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)297-308
Number of pages12
JournalAnnals of Internal Medicine
Volume97
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1982

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Patient Transfer
State Hospitals
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Internship and Residency
Infection
Medical Schools
Tertiary Care Centers
Cross Infection
Nursing Homes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in United States hospitals. Possible role of the house staff-patient transfer circuit. / Haley, R. W.; Hightower, A. W.; Khabbaz, R. F.; Thornsberry, C.; Martone, W. J.; Allen, J. R.; Hughes, J. M.

In: Annals of Internal Medicine, Vol. 97, No. 3, 1982, p. 297-308.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Haley, R. W. ; Hightower, A. W. ; Khabbaz, R. F. ; Thornsberry, C. ; Martone, W. J. ; Allen, J. R. ; Hughes, J. M. / The emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in United States hospitals. Possible role of the house staff-patient transfer circuit. In: Annals of Internal Medicine. 1982 ; Vol. 97, No. 3. pp. 297-308.
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