The emerging role of speckle-type POZ protein (SPOP) in cancer development

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Speckle-type POZ (pox virus and zinc finger protein) protein (SPOP) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase adaptor protein that is frequently mutated in prostate and endometrial cancers. All the cancer-associated SPOP mutations reported to date are clustered in the meprin and TRAF (Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor) homology (MATH) domain, presumably affecting substrate binding. SPOP mutations in prostate cancer are mutually exclusive with the ETS (Erythroblast transformation-specific) family gene rearrangements and define a distinct molecular subclass of prostate cancer. SPOP mutations contribute to prostate cancer development by altering the steady-state levels of key components in the androgen-signaling pathway.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1498-1502
Number of pages5
JournalDrug Discovery Today
Volume19
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2014

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Prostatic Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Proteins
Mutation
Tiopronin
Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-Associated Peptides and Proteins
Erythroblasts
Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases
Gene Rearrangement
Zinc Fingers
Endometrial Neoplasms
Androgens
Viruses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The emerging role of speckle-type POZ protein (SPOP) in cancer development. / Mani, Ram Shankar.

In: Drug Discovery Today, Vol. 19, No. 9, 01.09.2014, p. 1498-1502.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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