The radiographic prevalence of geniculate ganglion dehiscence in normal and congenitally thin temporal bones

Brandon Isaacson, Jeffrey T. Vrabec

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of a dehiscent geniculate ganglion on routine temporal bone computed tomography (CT). STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective case review. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. PATIENTS: Two hundred seventy-eight consecutive temporal bone CT examinations for a total of 556 sides were reviewed. One hundred ninety-one sides were excluded. Reasons for exclusion included reconstructed coronal views, no coronal views, or a pathologic process, which involved the geniculate ganglion. Six examinations were from patients with clinical superior canal dehiscence confirmed by surgical repair or positive vestibular evoked myogenic potentials. Twenty-four scans were from patients with radiographic superior canal dehiscence confirmed by two independent readings. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The incidence of geniculate ganglion dehiscence in patients with and without radiographic or clinical superior canal dehiscence. Dehiscent geniculate ganglion was defined as at least two consecutive cuts on a coronal CT showing no bone overlying the geniculate ganglion. RESULTS: The overall incidence of a dehiscent geniculate ganglion was 14.5% in the 365 sides reviewed. The incidence of a dehiscent geniculate ganglion is increased in patients with radiographic and clinical superior canal dehiscence as compared with normal patients and was significantly different by χ analysis (38.1 versus 11.4%). CONCLUSION: The presence of radiographic geniculate ganglion dehiscence is common. This finding has particular importance when the middle cranial fossa or subtemporal approach is used, as the facial nerve is more at risk especially when used to address superior canal dehiscence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)107-110
Number of pages4
JournalOtology and Neurotology
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

Keywords

  • Facial nerve
  • Geniculate ganglion
  • Middle fossa
  • Skull base
  • Subtemporal approach
  • Temporal bone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Clinical Neurology

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