The role of posttraumatic growth and timing of quitting smoking as moderators of the relationship between stigma and psychological distress among lung cancer survivors who are former smokers

Megan Johnson Shen, Elliot J. Coups, Yuelin Li, Jimmie C. Holland, Heidi A. Hamann, Jamie S. Ostroff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective Patients diagnosed with lung cancer report high levels of stigma and psychological distress. This study examined posttraumatic growth among lung cancer survivors as a potential buffer against this relationship between stigma and psychological distress and examined how these relationships differed by the timing of quitting smoking (pre versus post-diagnosis). Methods Stages IA and IB non-small-cell lung cancer survivors (N = 141) who were former smokers, 1-6 years post-treatment, and had no evidence of disease completed standardized questionnaires assessing stigma, posttraumatic growth, timing of quitting smoking history, and psychological distress. Results Hierarchical linear regression and simple slope analyses indicated that among those who quit smoking prior to diagnosis (pre-diagnosis quitters), stigma had a positive association with psychological distress at high levels of posttraumatic growth (p = 0.003) and had a positive (but non-significant) association with psychological distress among those with low levels of posttraumatic growth (p = 0.167). Among those who quit smoking after diagnosis (post-diagnosis quitters), stigma had a positive association with psychological distress among those with low levels of posttraumatic growth (p = 0.004) but had no relationship among those with high levels of posttraumatic growth (p = 0.880). Conclusions Findings indicate that posttraumatic growth buffers against the negative effects of stigma on psychological distress but only among post-diagnosis quitters. Future interventions could focus on fostering posttraumatic growth as a way to decrease the negative effects of stigma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)683-690
Number of pages8
JournalPsycho-Oncology
Volume24
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015

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Survivors
Lung Neoplasms
Smoking
Psychology
Growth
Buffers
Foster Home Care
Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
Linear Models
History

Keywords

  • lung cancer survivor
  • posttraumatic growth
  • psychological distress
  • smoking cessation
  • stigma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

The role of posttraumatic growth and timing of quitting smoking as moderators of the relationship between stigma and psychological distress among lung cancer survivors who are former smokers. / Shen, Megan Johnson; Coups, Elliot J.; Li, Yuelin; Holland, Jimmie C.; Hamann, Heidi A.; Ostroff, Jamie S.

In: Psycho-Oncology, Vol. 24, No. 6, 01.06.2015, p. 683-690.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shen, Megan Johnson ; Coups, Elliot J. ; Li, Yuelin ; Holland, Jimmie C. ; Hamann, Heidi A. ; Ostroff, Jamie S. / The role of posttraumatic growth and timing of quitting smoking as moderators of the relationship between stigma and psychological distress among lung cancer survivors who are former smokers. In: Psycho-Oncology. 2015 ; Vol. 24, No. 6. pp. 683-690.
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