The urodynamic consequences of posterior urethral valves

Craig A Peters, M. Bolkier, S. B. Bauer, W. H. Hendren, A. H. Colodny, J. Mandell, A. B. Retik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

133 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We evaluated urodynamically 41 patients with posterior urethral valves because of signs or symptoms of incontinence (35), frequency (3), hydronephrosis (2) and infection (1). Findings included normal urodynamic evaluations in 3 patients, 2 had high voiding pressures secondary to outlet resistance and 1 had incontinence on the basis of external urethral sphincter damage. In the remainder 3 patterns of bladder dysfunction were identified. Myogenic failure with overflow incontinence occurred in 14 patients. In this group clean intermittent catheterization or Valsalva's voiding was used for emptying. Hyperreflexic bladders were seen in 10 patients. Pharmacological suppression of instability was effective in 5 of 7 patients treated; 1 required bladder augmentation. Eleven children had a small capacity bladder and poor compliance. Post-void residuals were low and these bladders were generally but not always stable. Pharmacological bladder relaxation was successful in 3 patients, 3 underwent augmentation, 1 did well with α-agonists and followup is unavailable on the other 4. These 3 patterns of bladder dysfunction represent an overlapping constellation of residual urodynamic abnormalities due to previous bladder outlet obstruction. Individual patients may show facets of several types of dysfunction associated with 1 predominant pattern.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)122-126
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume144
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jul 20 1990

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Urodynamics
Urinary Bladder
Intermittent Urethral Catheterization
Pharmacology
Urinary Bladder Neck Obstruction
Hydronephrosis
Urethra
Signs and Symptoms
Pressure
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Peters, C. A., Bolkier, M., Bauer, S. B., Hendren, W. H., Colodny, A. H., Mandell, J., & Retik, A. B. (1990). The urodynamic consequences of posterior urethral valves. Journal of Urology, 144(1), 122-126.

The urodynamic consequences of posterior urethral valves. / Peters, Craig A; Bolkier, M.; Bauer, S. B.; Hendren, W. H.; Colodny, A. H.; Mandell, J.; Retik, A. B.

In: Journal of Urology, Vol. 144, No. 1, 20.07.1990, p. 122-126.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Peters, CA, Bolkier, M, Bauer, SB, Hendren, WH, Colodny, AH, Mandell, J & Retik, AB 1990, 'The urodynamic consequences of posterior urethral valves', Journal of Urology, vol. 144, no. 1, pp. 122-126.
Peters CA, Bolkier M, Bauer SB, Hendren WH, Colodny AH, Mandell J et al. The urodynamic consequences of posterior urethral valves. Journal of Urology. 1990 Jul 20;144(1):122-126.
Peters, Craig A ; Bolkier, M. ; Bauer, S. B. ; Hendren, W. H. ; Colodny, A. H. ; Mandell, J. ; Retik, A. B. / The urodynamic consequences of posterior urethral valves. In: Journal of Urology. 1990 ; Vol. 144, No. 1. pp. 122-126.
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