Training in transplant infectious diseases

A survey of infectious diseases and transplant infectious diseases fellows in the United States and Canada

On behalf of the American Society of Transplantation, Infectious Diseases Community of Practice

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Infectious diseases (ID) specialists with experience in managing infections in transplant recipients and other immunocompromised hosts are increasingly needed as these fields expand. Methods: To evaluate experiences and identify trainee-described needs in transplant infectious diseases (TID) training, the American Society of Transplantation, Infectious Diseases Community of Practice (AST IDCOP) surveyed ID fellows across the United States and TID fellows in the United States and Canada and received responses from 203 ID fellows and 13 TID fellows. Results: Among ID fellows, the amount of TID training during ID fellowship was rated between less than ideal and adequate. Reasons cited included limited frequency of didactic activities and limited exposure to transplant patients during training. In particular, ID fellows at low-volume transplantation centers expressed interest in more TID training time, away training opportunities, and specific TID didactics. Educational resources of high interest among trainees were case-based interactive websites, mobile phone applications with TID guidelines, and a centralized collection of relevant articles. Pediatric ID fellows reported lower satisfaction scores with TID training, while TID fellows were overall satisfied or more than satisfied with their training experience. Conclusion: Findings from this survey will inform local and national TID educational initiatives.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere12915
JournalTransplant Infectious Disease
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2018

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Canada
Communicable Diseases
Transplants
Surveys and Questionnaires
Mobile Applications
Cell Phones
Immunocompromised Host

Keywords

  • educational
  • survey
  • trainee
  • transplant infectious diseases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Training in transplant infectious diseases : A survey of infectious diseases and transplant infectious diseases fellows in the United States and Canada. / On behalf of the American Society of Transplantation, Infectious Diseases Community of Practice.

In: Transplant Infectious Disease, Vol. 20, No. 4, e12915, 01.08.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

On behalf of the American Society of Transplantation, Infectious Diseases Community of Practice. / Training in transplant infectious diseases : A survey of infectious diseases and transplant infectious diseases fellows in the United States and Canada. In: Transplant Infectious Disease. 2018 ; Vol. 20, No. 4.
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abstract = "Background: Infectious diseases (ID) specialists with experience in managing infections in transplant recipients and other immunocompromised hosts are increasingly needed as these fields expand. Methods: To evaluate experiences and identify trainee-described needs in transplant infectious diseases (TID) training, the American Society of Transplantation, Infectious Diseases Community of Practice (AST IDCOP) surveyed ID fellows across the United States and TID fellows in the United States and Canada and received responses from 203 ID fellows and 13 TID fellows. Results: Among ID fellows, the amount of TID training during ID fellowship was rated between less than ideal and adequate. Reasons cited included limited frequency of didactic activities and limited exposure to transplant patients during training. In particular, ID fellows at low-volume transplantation centers expressed interest in more TID training time, away training opportunities, and specific TID didactics. Educational resources of high interest among trainees were case-based interactive websites, mobile phone applications with TID guidelines, and a centralized collection of relevant articles. Pediatric ID fellows reported lower satisfaction scores with TID training, while TID fellows were overall satisfied or more than satisfied with their training experience. Conclusion: Findings from this survey will inform local and national TID educational initiatives.",
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