Unique contribution of fatigue to disability in community-dwelling adults with traumatic brain injury

Shannon Juengst, Elizabeth Skidmore, Patricia M. Arenth, Christian Niyonkuru, Ketki D. Raina

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To examine the unique contribution of fatigue to self-reported disability in community-dwelling adults with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Design: A cross-sectional cohort design. Setting: Community dwellings. Participants: Adults (N=50) with a history of mild to severe TBI were assessed. Intervention: Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures: This study assessed the contribution of fatigue (Modified Fatigue Impact Scale) to disability (Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory), controlling for executive functions (Frontal Systems Behavior Scale), depression status (major depression in partial remission/current major depression/depressive symptoms or no history of depression), and initial injury severity (uncomplicated mild, complicated mild, moderate, or severe). Results: Fatigue was found to contribute uniquely to the variance in self-reported disability (β=.47, P<.001) after controlling for injury severity, executive functions, and depression status. The overall model was significant (F4,45=17.32, P<.001) and explained 61% of the variance in self-reported disability, with fatigue alone accounting for 12% of the variance in self-reported disability (F1,45=13.97, P<.001). Conclusions: Fatigue contributes uniquely to disability status among community-dwelling adults with chronic TBI, independent of injury severity, executive functions, and depression. Addressing fatigue through targeted interventions may help to improve self-perceived disability in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)74-79
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume94
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

Keywords

  • Brain injuries
  • Fatigue
  • Rehabilitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

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