Valid serial length measurements in preterm infants permit characterization of growth patterns

Lara Pavageau, Charles R. Rosenfeld, Roy Heyne, L. Steven Brown, Jenna Whitham, Cheryl Lair, Luc P. Brion

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background:: The lack of a valid and safe method for measuring length in critically ill preterm neonates has led to a primary focus on weight gain. Local problem:: Paucity of valid length measurements, precluding the accurate analysis of growth patterns. Methods:: Quality improvement project among infants < 29 weeks or small for gestational age < 35 weeks with embedded validation of (1) a caliper (infantometer) for length measurements and (2) length measurements during the first week to estimate birth length. Intervention:: Implementation of valid methods to measure length. Results:: We validated infantometer measurements and first week length measurements. The percentage of neonates with valid measurements during the first week rose from 10% to 78%, resulting in increased identification of classifiable growth patterns from < 10% to 89%. Conclusions:: By increasing the percentage of neonates with valid length measurements in the first week postnatal, we identified an increased number of neonates with classifiable growth abnormalities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Perinatology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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Premature Infants
Newborn Infant
Growth
Quality Improvement
Critical Illness
Gestational Age
Weight Gain
Parturition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Valid serial length measurements in preterm infants permit characterization of growth patterns. / Pavageau, Lara; Rosenfeld, Charles R.; Heyne, Roy; Brown, L. Steven; Whitham, Jenna; Lair, Cheryl; Brion, Luc P.

In: Journal of Perinatology, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Lair, Cheryl

AU - Brion, Luc P.

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