Vascular endothelial-targeted therapy combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy induces inflammatory intratumoral Infiltrates and inhibits tumor relapses after surgery

Brendan F. Judy, Louis A. Aliperti, Jarrod D. Predina, Daniel Levine, Veena Kapoor, Philip E. Thorpe, Steven M. Albelda, Sunil Singhal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Surgery is the most effective therapy for cancer in the United States, but disease still recurs in more than 40% of patients within 5 years after resection. Chemotherapy is given postoperatively to prevent relapses; however, this approach has had marginal success. After surgery, recurrent tumors depend on rapid neovascular proliferation to deliver nutrients and oxygen. Phosphatidylserine (PS) is exposed on the vascular endothelial cells in the tumor microenvironment but is notably absent on blood vessels in normal tissues. Thus, PS is an attractive target for cancer therapy after surgery. Syngeneic mice bearing TC1 lung cancer tumors were treated with mch1N11 (a novel mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets PS), cisplatin (cis), or combination after surgery. Tumor relapses and disease progression were decreased 90% by combination therapy compared with a 50% response rate for cis alone (P =.02). Mice receiving postoperative mch1N11 had no wound-related complications or added systemic toxicity in comparison to control animals. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that the effects of mch1N11 were associated with a dense infiltration of inflammatory cells, particularly granulocytes. This strategy was independent of the adaptive immune system. Together, these data suggest that vascular-targeted strategies directed against exposed PS may be a powerful adjunct to postoperative chemotherapy in preventing relapses after cancer surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)352-359
Number of pages8
JournalNeoplasia
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2012

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Blood Vessels
Phosphatidylserines
Recurrence
Drug Therapy
Neoplasms
Cisplatin
Therapeutics
Tumor Microenvironment
Granulocytes
Disease Progression
Immune System
Lung Neoplasms
Endothelial Cells
Monoclonal Antibodies
Oxygen
Food
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Vascular endothelial-targeted therapy combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy induces inflammatory intratumoral Infiltrates and inhibits tumor relapses after surgery. / Judy, Brendan F.; Aliperti, Louis A.; Predina, Jarrod D.; Levine, Daniel; Kapoor, Veena; Thorpe, Philip E.; Albelda, Steven M.; Singhal, Sunil.

In: Neoplasia, Vol. 14, No. 4, 04.2012, p. 352-359.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Judy, BF, Aliperti, LA, Predina, JD, Levine, D, Kapoor, V, Thorpe, PE, Albelda, SM & Singhal, S 2012, 'Vascular endothelial-targeted therapy combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy induces inflammatory intratumoral Infiltrates and inhibits tumor relapses after surgery', Neoplasia, vol. 14, no. 4, pp. 352-359. https://doi.org/10.1593/neo.12208
Judy, Brendan F. ; Aliperti, Louis A. ; Predina, Jarrod D. ; Levine, Daniel ; Kapoor, Veena ; Thorpe, Philip E. ; Albelda, Steven M. ; Singhal, Sunil. / Vascular endothelial-targeted therapy combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy induces inflammatory intratumoral Infiltrates and inhibits tumor relapses after surgery. In: Neoplasia. 2012 ; Vol. 14, No. 4. pp. 352-359.
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