Ventilatory support and predictors of hospital stay in neonates

Shyang Yun Pamela K Shiao, Claire M. Andrews, Chul Ahn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Ventilatory support in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) and related care modalities have profound lifelong benefits for neonates. Method: Ventilatory support and predictors of hospital stay were prospectively examined in 262 neonates and their mothers who were admitted to a NICU. A mixed-model, generalized estimating equation approach was used for prediction analysis, accounting for the dependencies of multiple births (26.3% of sample). Results: Predictors for hospital stay included gestational age, congenital defects, birth weight, days requiring ventilator support, and oxvgen support. Cubic curves present the best-fit model for the relationships between maturity (gestational age and birth weight) and length of hospital stay; along with days requiring oxygen support, ventilator support, and central arterial and venous access lines. Conclusion: Ventilatory support and associated care modalities are important resources for high-risk neonates during hospital stay. Future studies need to determine the best care course for neonatal ventilatory support to prevent complications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)166-172
Number of pages7
JournalNewborn and Infant Nursing Reviews
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2003

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Length of Stay
Newborn Infant
Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Mechanical Ventilators
Birth Weight
Gestational Age
Multiple Birth Offspring
Mothers
Oxygen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Ventilatory support and predictors of hospital stay in neonates. / Shiao, Shyang Yun Pamela K; Andrews, Claire M.; Ahn, Chul.

In: Newborn and Infant Nursing Reviews, Vol. 3, No. 4, 12.2003, p. 166-172.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shiao, Shyang Yun Pamela K ; Andrews, Claire M. ; Ahn, Chul. / Ventilatory support and predictors of hospital stay in neonates. In: Newborn and Infant Nursing Reviews. 2003 ; Vol. 3, No. 4. pp. 166-172.
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