What makes epilepsy drug refractory?

Deborah E. Briggs, Jacqueline A. French

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

About 20-40% of patients with epilepsy will be refractory to medical treatment with antiepileptic drugs. It is unclear whether patients are already drug-resistant at the time of their initial presentation, or whether they become so over the course of their illness. Identifying predictors for drug-refractory epilepsy may be important for directing epilepsy patients to an effective nonpharmacological treatment, such as surgery or the vagus nerve stimulator, in a timely manner. In addition, understanding the factors that lead to the drug-refractory state may facilitate the development of new therapies that are effective in the resistant subgroup. This paper identifies various predictors that have been associated with drug-refractory epilepsy, discusses the evidence behind each factor and recommends strategies for clarifying predictors of refractoriness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)127-131
Number of pages5
JournalExpert Review of Neurotherapeutics
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2003

Fingerprint

Epilepsy
Vagus Nerve
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Anticonvulsants
Therapeutics
Drug Resistant Epilepsy

Keywords

  • Antiepileptic drug therapy
  • Genetic factors
  • Genetic polymorphism
  • Multiple drug resistance gene
  • Pharmacoresistance
  • Refractory epilepsy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

What makes epilepsy drug refractory? / Briggs, Deborah E.; French, Jacqueline A.

In: Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics, Vol. 3, No. 1, 01.2003, p. 127-131.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Briggs, Deborah E. ; French, Jacqueline A. / What makes epilepsy drug refractory?. In: Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics. 2003 ; Vol. 3, No. 1. pp. 127-131.
@article{d80017c8b98b4ba4b16e9945f428d580,
title = "What makes epilepsy drug refractory?",
abstract = "About 20-40{\%} of patients with epilepsy will be refractory to medical treatment with antiepileptic drugs. It is unclear whether patients are already drug-resistant at the time of their initial presentation, or whether they become so over the course of their illness. Identifying predictors for drug-refractory epilepsy may be important for directing epilepsy patients to an effective nonpharmacological treatment, such as surgery or the vagus nerve stimulator, in a timely manner. In addition, understanding the factors that lead to the drug-refractory state may facilitate the development of new therapies that are effective in the resistant subgroup. This paper identifies various predictors that have been associated with drug-refractory epilepsy, discusses the evidence behind each factor and recommends strategies for clarifying predictors of refractoriness.",
keywords = "Antiepileptic drug therapy, Genetic factors, Genetic polymorphism, Multiple drug resistance gene, Pharmacoresistance, Refractory epilepsy",
author = "Briggs, {Deborah E.} and French, {Jacqueline A.}",
year = "2003",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1586/14737175.3.1.127",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "3",
pages = "127--131",
journal = "Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics",
issn = "1473-7175",
publisher = "Expert Reviews Ltd.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - What makes epilepsy drug refractory?

AU - Briggs, Deborah E.

AU - French, Jacqueline A.

PY - 2003/1

Y1 - 2003/1

N2 - About 20-40% of patients with epilepsy will be refractory to medical treatment with antiepileptic drugs. It is unclear whether patients are already drug-resistant at the time of their initial presentation, or whether they become so over the course of their illness. Identifying predictors for drug-refractory epilepsy may be important for directing epilepsy patients to an effective nonpharmacological treatment, such as surgery or the vagus nerve stimulator, in a timely manner. In addition, understanding the factors that lead to the drug-refractory state may facilitate the development of new therapies that are effective in the resistant subgroup. This paper identifies various predictors that have been associated with drug-refractory epilepsy, discusses the evidence behind each factor and recommends strategies for clarifying predictors of refractoriness.

AB - About 20-40% of patients with epilepsy will be refractory to medical treatment with antiepileptic drugs. It is unclear whether patients are already drug-resistant at the time of their initial presentation, or whether they become so over the course of their illness. Identifying predictors for drug-refractory epilepsy may be important for directing epilepsy patients to an effective nonpharmacological treatment, such as surgery or the vagus nerve stimulator, in a timely manner. In addition, understanding the factors that lead to the drug-refractory state may facilitate the development of new therapies that are effective in the resistant subgroup. This paper identifies various predictors that have been associated with drug-refractory epilepsy, discusses the evidence behind each factor and recommends strategies for clarifying predictors of refractoriness.

KW - Antiepileptic drug therapy

KW - Genetic factors

KW - Genetic polymorphism

KW - Multiple drug resistance gene

KW - Pharmacoresistance

KW - Refractory epilepsy

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0037226561&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0037226561&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1586/14737175.3.1.127

DO - 10.1586/14737175.3.1.127

M3 - Article

C2 - 19810855

AN - SCOPUS:0037226561

VL - 3

SP - 127

EP - 131

JO - Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics

JF - Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics

SN - 1473-7175

IS - 1

ER -