Wound care quality of life in aging patients undergoing electrodessication and curettage on the back

Kara Pretzlaff, Lindsey West, Michael N. Nemeh, Divya Srivastava, Rajiv I. Nijhawan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Patient satisfaction is an important consideration when determining the optimal treatment for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). One critical aspect of patient satisfaction is post-procedural wound care quality of life (QOL), especially as the elderly population grows. This study aimed to evaluate post-procedural wound care QOL in elderly patients undergoing electrodessication and curettage (ED&C) for NMSC in difficult-to-reach areas, namely the posterior shoulder and back. To do so, patient demographics, functionality, co-morbidities, and post-procedural wound care QOL were assessed in twenty elderly patients (age > 65) who underwent ED&C for NMSC at a single academic dermatologic surgery clinic. Independent t-tests were used to evaluate how QOL related to patient age, gender, living situation, relationship status, co-morbidities, and functionality. Patients who lived alone had better-wound care QOL compared to patients who did not live alone (p = 0.04). Patients reported concerns about knocking the wound and did not feel they could care for the wound independently. Patients who were married, female, or had a lower comorbidity score reported poorer QOL, although this finding was not statistically significant. This study indicates that patients’ QOL can be negatively affected by post-procedural wounds located in difficult-to-reach areas. As dermatologists strive to improve patient satisfaction, wound care quality of life should be considered when choosing treatment for NMSC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalArchives of Dermatological Research
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Elderly
  • Quality of life
  • Skin cancer
  • Wound care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

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