You AhR what you eat: Linking diet and immunity

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is responsible for the toxic effects of environmental pollutants such as dioxin, but little is known about its normal physiological functions. Li et al. (2011) now show that specific dietary compounds present in cruciferous vegetables act through the AhR to promote intestinal immune function, revealing AhR as a critical link between diet and immunity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)489-491
Number of pages3
JournalCell
Volume147
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 28 2011

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Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptors
Nutrition
Immunity
Diet
Environmental Pollutants
Dioxins
Poisons
Vegetables

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

You AhR what you eat : Linking diet and immunity. / Hooper, Lora V.

In: Cell, Vol. 147, No. 3, 28.10.2011, p. 489-491.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hooper, Lora V. / You AhR what you eat : Linking diet and immunity. In: Cell. 2011 ; Vol. 147, No. 3. pp. 489-491.
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